REFS

A PLACE FOR THINGS!

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ianference:

It is truly a strange thing when a steam pipe bursts under an abandoned building in the dead of winter, but that’s exactly what happened under the Clinic Building at Greystone Park State Hospital in 2007, a month before the building was unceremoniously knocked down.  The steam congregated near the ceiling of the abandoned asylum infirmary, condensing on the pipes and dripping down in regular patterns - and creating these ice stalagmites.  An hour after taking this photograph, demolition workers came into the building and chased us through the tunnels; we had to hide in an attic in 0 degree weather for hours while cops searched for us.  The next time I drove out there, there was no trace that a building had ever stood in this spot.

ianference:

It is truly a strange thing when a steam pipe bursts under an abandoned building in the dead of winter, but that’s exactly what happened under the Clinic Building at Greystone Park State Hospital in 2007, a month before the building was unceremoniously knocked down.  The steam congregated near the ceiling of the abandoned asylum infirmary, condensing on the pipes and dripping down in regular patterns - and creating these ice stalagmites.  An hour after taking this photograph, demolition workers came into the building and chased us through the tunnels; we had to hide in an attic in 0 degree weather for hours while cops searched for us.  The next time I drove out there, there was no trace that a building had ever stood in this spot.

(via demi-friendo)

Filed under jotaro queuejo

22,014 notes

archiemcphee:

This awesome arboreal dwelling is the Living the High Life Tree House created by Blue Forest, a British tree house design and construction firm. It’s a luxury family-sized complex featuring two separate tree houses, one for kids and one for their parents. The elevated dwellings are connected by a network of rope bridges which also lead to an adventure play area and an assault course, the latter of which is also accessible via an 80-yard zip line.

It may look rustic, but this is a top-of-the-line tree house. The kids’ house features three medieval towers, and inside one of them a concealed hatch in the upper floor leads to a secret game room containing a plasma TV and video game console. Meanwhile the grown-ups’ treehouse features a conical thatched roof and interior walls made of hand-split oak shingles and cedar tongue-and-groove boards. Inside there’s a kitchen (complete with plenty of wine storage), bathroom, and a large open living area for treetop entertaining. The complex also features accommodations for guests of the family.

Head over to the Blue Forest website to check out more of their amazing custom-built tree houses.

[via designboom]

(via obliviousham)

Filed under jotaro queuejo

1,661 notes

slorestgreen:

So I found out something today that blew my mind. These pictures are from two Yes album covers, Fragile and Yessongs. I was reading through Roger Dean’s Views when I made a really awesome discovery (for me at least): these pictures are actually telling a story in chronological order. The first two show the front and back of Fragile, where a planet breaks apart over time. From the book:

"The planet disintegrates but the inhabitants have built a spaceship which on the Yessongs cover is shown guiding fragments of the planet as spores through space. The second picture on the Yessongs cover shows these spores impregnating a new planet, introducing life. In the fourth picture the cities evolve.”

As you may know, I am a giant fan of Roger Dean’s work, and it’s really cool to understand his paintings at a deeper level.

(via funnyworldandfunnypie)

Filed under jotaro queuejo